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A good day at Exeter and Wincanton runners

18.1.2017 - We were pleased with our runners at Exeter yesterday where Rescued Glory, having his first run in a handicap, travelled so well in the 2m7f handicap hurdle  but showed his lack of experience when he took up the lead with three flights to go and was a little green in front enabling Pink Gin to get the bettter of him before the next and score a two lengths success. It was a very encouraging run and we are confident we wil find a race for him soon.

Lady Longshot had every chance after the last in the mares' handicap hurdle but was swallowed up on the run in to finish four and a half lengths in fifth. Again it was a decent run and we're sure to find her another opportunity soon.

We run two at Wincanton tomorrow with Unison in the Higos Insurance Services Yeovil Handicap Hurdle and Tikkinthebox in the "National Hunt" Novices' Hurdle.

Rescued Glory after finishing second at Exeter yesterday

REscued Glory Exeter

A win for the Kid with Jamie on board.

17.1.2017 - Jamie Moore's first ride for the yard proved a winning one at Plumpoton yesterday where Kid Kalanisi, back over hurdles, won the 3m1f handicap hurdle.

His jumping was quite hairy in places, but he took up the running two flights from home to stay on really well and catch the front running Ghost River on the run-in and win by 2 3/4 of a length.

It was a shame that Nick Scholfield missed out on a winning ride, but he was out injured afrer falling at Warwick on Saturday.

Kid Kalanisi may run again over hurdles at Uttoxeter at the end of the month.

Feeding fibre for performance

2.1.2017 - We've teamed up with Somerset-based Nuumed which manuactures fantastic saddle pads, among other things. You can read my second blog for them feeding fibre for performance, here. https://nuumed.com/blog/49-feeding-fibre-for-performance-written-by-jeremy-scott

Or take a look below. 

 

Feeding fibre for performance – written by Jeremy Scott

For a racehorse to perform to its ability its needs the right type of fuel and in the right quantities to allow for maximum effort.

In its natural state a horse, like most herbivores, will eat little and often, constantly nibbling away.

However, when a horse is in training, the energy intake, fed in the form of carbohydrates (grain) will increase and this will be fed as part of its daily ration – in our case four times a day at 6am, 12.30pm, 5pm and 11pm.

As a horse is a natural trickle feeder, it still needs to have constant access to roughage (hay/haylage) in order to keep its gut healthy.

At Holworthy Farm, our aim is to reproduce the way a horse naturally feeds are far as possible, while at the same upping the energy intake, so they are fed ad lib haylage or hay, depending on the horse.

A common problem in racing is that horses do not consume enough calories to maintain their optimal weight and they will self-limit their intake. With rigorous training schedules and the fact that some thoroughbreds expend a lot of nervous energy it can be a challenge to provide adequate nutrition to horses in training.

The key, and why feeding horses is so often referred to as an art, is getting the balance right between the energy you feed and the roughage. By feeding our horses four times they are presented with smaller meals and this can act as a stimulus and encourage them to eat.

Also, by keeping their stomachs healthy the number of horses with stomach ulcers  is reduced. That said, we do still have horses that have this problem. We scoped a few recently choosing those that we felt weren’t doing as well on their feed and others that had a nervous disposition. Interestingly, we had more cases of ulcers in the horses with a more nervous disposition than the fussy eaters.

Giving horses high energy feed on an empty stomach can increase the risk of stomach ulcers so in order to reduce this from occurring we will mix alfalfa with their first morning feed as an additional source of fibre. This will reduce the effect of acid on an empty stomach. Many racing yards will give a hard feed in the morning, then exercise and then provide roughage but we do not feel this is conducive to keeping them healthy inside.

We also adapt the feed according to the horse and overfeeding is almost worse than underfeeding because of the various associated problems. When we trained County Derry he would tie up so we worked closely with Spillers horse feeds to devise a diet that was high fibre (roughage) low starch (carbohydrate) as the grain increased his chance of tying up. 

Novice hurdle goes Ellen’s Way

1.1.2017 - Ellen’s Way’s win at Warwick in the 2m5f novice hurdle on New Year’s Eve was the perfect conclusion to 2016. I actually had a bet onher, something I very rarely do, as I considered she had plenty going for her as she wants soft ground anda trip. 

She looked beaten approaching the penultimate flight, but she’s a true stayer and rallied well under Nick Scholfield to get up by a head from Copper Kay.

After a tough race, we’re in no hurry to run her again quickly, and her future is very much over fences. 

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Contact

Jeremy Scott
Holworthy Farm
Brompton Regis
Dulverton

T: 01398 371414
M: 07709 279483
E: holworthyfarm@yahoo.com

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